Cooking Gently with Flowers

June 6, 2016

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As promised, here is the famous chapter on flower cookery.  I offer it to you, without comment, and in its entirety.

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4 Comments

  • Mark. says:

    Could add daylilies (used dried in Chinese cooking, but palatable fresh; flavor varies with color and age of blossom) and hollyhocks, notably. I know that a few seasonal tree blossoms like redbud taste pretty good, and I’ve seen recipes for stuffed tulip…

  • Amy M says:

    Violet marmalade! It’s like a daydream of a condiment, or a jabberwocky fairy food. I’ll be trying this recipe forthwith!

  • I love this, Ruth! Thank you for sharing. I’m especially intrigued by the ‘Ice Cream of Roses’, do you think it would be a more delicate flavour than a few drops of rosewater?

    My Granny (94yo!) is British and I had a ball this past Christmas going through her old recipe/housekeeping books. They were a very industrial bunch back then. One of her books has an extensive chapter on recipes for berry flavoured alcohols or “shrubs”.

    I’m new to your blog, but am loving looking over the archives. I’ll be back!

  • May says:

    What a lovely book. Thanks for sharing. I love the idea of the chrysanthemum salad. We usually drink chrysanthemum tea in the hot weather to balance your humors (as per Chinese medicine.) Every home keeps a little stash of these dried flowers, ready to make into a beverage. I don’t know of recipes where we eat the flowers, although the leaves or a cousin of the flower is quite nice stir fried.

    Am off to hunt for an original copy of this book.

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