A Delicious Little Morsel

January 7, 2019

It’s an R month.  Which to me, at least, means lots of oysters.

Ordered a hundred over Christmas (they live a good ten days in the refrigerator, covered with a damp towel).  At the end, when we’d had our fill of oysters on the half shell, I fried the last of them.

So good!

Fried Oysters

Shopping list: 1 pint oysters, 1 pint buttermilk, 2 cups cornmeal

Staples: flour, salt, oil.

Carefully drain the oysters, and put them in 2 cups of buttermilk for about 10 minutes.

Line a baking sheet with waxed paper or a silpat pad. Mix 2 cups of cornmeal with 2 cups of flour and a teaspoon of salt.  Pick up each oyster, shake it a bit, allowing the buttermilk to drip off before plunking it into the cornmeal mixture; toss it about so it’s coated on all sides and place it on the lined baking sheet. Do it with the next oyster, and the next….

In a deep pot heat at least 2 inches of oil until it registers 375 on a thermometer. Pick up an oyster, shake it to remove excess breading and plunk it into the oil. Fry for about a minute and a half until just golden, then remove with a slotted spoon and set on paper towels to drain. You should be able to fry 6 to 8 oysters at a time.  Bring oil back to 375 before adding a new batch. 

Sprinkle with salt and serve with plenty of fresh lemons.  Some people like tartar sauce or remoulade with their oysters, but I think that masks the delicate flavor. 

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Christmas is Over, But….

January 5, 2019

You still have things to celebrate.  People you love. Presents to buy.  And I just came upon this remarkable offering from the wonderful Celia Sack at Omnivore books.

She’s bought a treasure-trove of old Chez Panisse menus from Fritz Streiff, who has been a part of the restaurant pretty much since the beginning. Among the many things Fritz has been at Chez Panisse, is the voice of Alice Waters; he’s collaborated on many of her books.

And Alice has never done anything by half measures.  She’s had great artists – David Goines, Patty Curtan, Wesley Tanner, among many others – design her menus. And I imagine there’s something here that would make just about anyone happy. The prices are definitely right; these vintage menus are both food history and gorgeous art.

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Napa Valley, Mid-Eighties

December 27, 2018

Looking for wrapping paper the other day, I came upon a small trove of old menus from St. Helena, when it was a quieter place than it is today.

The original French Laundry, under Don and Sally Schmitt, was a lovely, simple place much beloved by local winemakers. (Don was also the town mayor.) They had the best wine list: everyone around them was deeply represented.  And they served wonderful California food.

Mustard’s was another beloved local establishment.  Cindy Pawlcyn had her finger on the food pulse; she once called her place a “deluxe truckstop.” And unlike most of the old places in the Valley, Mustard’s is still going strong, still pleasing people.

Miramonte was more representative of what the tourists wanted…

And then there was Doidge’s.

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Gift Guide 2018: Get The Dirt

December 23, 2018

This is the day of the year when I always suggest giving a subscription to a food publication.  In the past I’ve suggested Fool, Cherry Bombe, Sabor, and the late lamented Lucky Peach- and I still think those are all great ideas. (For the one that’s no longer around, you might buy back issues.)

But this year I’m going to suggest something a bit different.  The Dirt is a compilation of the best articles supported by the Food and Environment Reporting Network. Here’s their mission statement:

“The Food & Environment Reporting Network is the first and only independent, non-profit news organization that produces in-depth and investigative journalism in the critically underreported areas of food, agriculture, and environmental health. Through partnerships with local and national mainstream media outlets, we seek to tell stories that will inspire, inform, and have lasting impact.”

It’s a much needed – institution, and the work they support is impressive.  (In the interest of full disclosure I should note that I’m on the editorial board.) Because FERN is a non-profit institution, this also means your gift is tax deductible.

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Gift Guide 2018: Why Not a Book?

December 22, 2018

Too late to order by mail?  You can still support your local bookstore.  Lots of possibilities there. For an  Italian food lover, for example, you might put together a selection of regional recipe books, covering Tuscany, Rome, Puglia, Venice.  For those who are enamored of the food of the middle east there are a number of great new books on the market (there’s always Ottolenghi, and I’m especially fond of Anissa Helou’s new Feast) .

They can, of course, buy these books for themselves.  This book, however, is one that seems meant to be a gift.

I’m generally suspicious of coffee table gift books, but there’s something so appealing about Let’s Eat France!: 1,250 specialty foods, 375 iconic recipes, 350 topics, 260 personalities, plus hundreds of maps, charts, tricks, tips, and everything else you want to know about the food of France,  that I find myself unable to put it down.  I’m pretty sure that anyone who loves the food of France will feel the same way about this quirky compilation.  Weighing in at 6 pounds, it covers  everything from famous chefs to glassware, pasta, historical menus, writers

cheese, fruit, tripe

The book, in short, is everything a gift book should be: big, bold, unusual, fun – and not the sort of thing a person is likely to buy for herself.

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