Things I Love: Another Great Kettle

June 2, 2017

I’ve written about my Picqout Ware tea kettle before.  I think it’s the most beautiful kettle I’ve ever seen. But once again, some negligent person (I’m not pointing any fingers here….) left it on the fire too long and burned off the handle.

In the past, you could send the kettles back to the factory in Scotland for a replacement handle. But sadly, the factory has now closed.  So I’ve been looking for a replacement.

This one turned up!  I was confused because it’s not labeled Picquot Ware, but rather Newmaid.

Turns out, however, that it’s the same company: the first kettles made by Picquot were marketed under the trade name ‘New Maid’ in 1946- 47 .  They changed their name to Picquot Ware in 1951.

You can read about it here.

I also turned up another, older kettle.  It’s American – and it’s the original.  Tomorrow I’ll show you this 1936 beauty.

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Categorised in:

6 Comments

  • gail says:

    love love love this kettle – it’s a stunner!
    i looked on eBay – and am concerned that
    it’s composed of aluminum.
    have i lived in california too long or are you
    concerned about cooking in aluminum?
    thanks, ruth – love your writing!

  • John says:

    I have a new Picquot Ware kettle I purchased in 2010
    Sadly, the wooden handle burned a bit when left too long on the stovetop.
    Do you have any suggestions for having repair work or handle replacement done.
    I love my kettle and want to bring itback to it’s original glory!

  • John says:

    I have a new Picquot Ware kettle I purchased in 2010
    Sadly, the wooden handle burned a bit when left too long on the stovetop.
    Do you have any suggestions for having repair work or handle replacement done.
    I love my kettle and want to bring it back to its original glory!

    • admin says:

      John,
      The same thing has happened to me – 3 times! I used to send them back to the Picquot people in Scotland, but now that they’ve gone out of business I have no remedy.

      It turns out that the Picquot people were not the first: the originals were made by Wagner in Ohio, and I’ve since found a couple of real beauties from them.

      Wish I had a better answer….

  • Peter says:

    Get a block of sycamore.
    Trace the profile of the existing handle onto it.
    Cut around it using a bandsaw.
    Shape it using a vise, files, sandpaper.
    Drill the holes, two drills may be required, one the diameter of the threaded portion of the bolt, and one the diameter or the cap, or head of the screw. The order is not so important as the depth. Do not go too deep with the wide drill, or you will have to shorten the screw. Best plan is, drill wide one first partway, then center the thin drill in the bottom of the hole. Might want to make two or three handles and pick the best one.

  • Ruth Reichl says:

    Peter! Thanks so much for this. I’m heading off to find some sycamore and a bandsaw.

Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *